[Ibogaine] How to Stop Opiate Withdrawals with Over the Counter Medications - Part 2

junkboy junkboy64 at gmail.com
Fri Oct 18 17:52:21 CDT 2013


-------As for Robitussin, it simply contains codeine, which is an opioid, a
basic one.
There's also a version that does not contain codeine, only pseudoephedrine,
(a decongestant, but also the precursor to crystal meth)------

here in the states robo doesnt contain codeine, it contains
Dextromethorphan which i believe is realated to opiates.. it never worked
for me. but the loperamide works good for me.. at high doses of course!!


On Fri, Oct 18, 2013 at 4:15 PM, Sergey Sibirian <sibirianfox at gmail.com>wrote:

> Eddie,
>
> As for immodium (Loperamide), here we go:
> ...........
> "...
> Mechanism of action[edit<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Loperamide&action=edit&section=2>
> ]
>  <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Loperamide_ball-and-stick.png>
>  <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Loperamide_ball-and-stick.png>
> Ball-and-stick model of loperamide molecule
>
> Loperamide is an opioid <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opioid>-receptor
> agonist <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agonist> and acts on the μ-opioid
> receptors <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mu_Opioid_receptor> in the myenteric
> plexus <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myenteric_plexus> of the large
> intestine; by itself it does not affect the central nervous system<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_nervous_system>.
> It works similarly to morphine <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morphine>,
> by decreasing the activity of the myenteric plexus, which in turn decreases
> the tone of the longitudinal and circular smooth muscles<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smooth_muscle> of
> the intestinal wall.[5]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immodium#cite_note-5>
> [6] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immodium#cite_note-6> This increases
> the amount of time substances stay in the intestine, allowing for more
> water to be absorbed out of the fecal matter. Loperamide also decreases
> colonic mass movements and suppresses thegastrocolic reflex<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastrocolic_reflex>
> .[7] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immodium#cite_note-7>
> Ability to cross the blood–brain barrier[edit<http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Loperamide&action=edit&section=3>
> ]
>
> Concurrent administration of P-glycoprotein inhibitors such as quinidine<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinidine> and
> its other isomer quinine <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinine>(although
> much higher doses must be used), PPIs<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_pump_inhibitor>
>  like omeprazole <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omeprazole> (Prilosec OTC)
> and even black pepper <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_pepper> (
> piperine <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piperine> as the active
> ingredient) could potentially allow loperamide to cross the blood–brain
> barrier <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood%E2%80%93brain_barrier>. It
> should however be noted that only quinidine with loperamide was found to
> produce respiratory depression, indicative of central opioid action.[8]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immodium#cite_note-8>
>
> It is a misconception that loperamide does not cross the blood–brain
> barrier. Loperamide does cross this barrier, although it is immediately
> pumped back out into non–central nervous system (CNS) circulation by
> P-glycoprotein <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P-glycoprotein>. While this
> mechanism effectively shields the CNS from exposure (and thus risk of CNS
> tolerance/dependence) to loperamide, many drugs are known to inhibit
> P-glycoprotein and may thus render the CNS vulnerable to opiate agonism by
> loperamide.[9] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immodium#cite_note-9>
>
> Loperamide has been shown to cause a mild physical dependence<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_dependence> during
> preclinical studies, specifically in mice, rats, and rhesus monkeys.
> Symptoms of mild opiate withdrawal have been observed following abrupt
> discontinuation of long-term therapy with loperamide.[10]<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immodium#cite_note-10>
> [11] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immodium#cite_note-11>
> .............
> As you can see, it's a very unique opioid, which has small potential to
> penetrate the brain and thus cause tolerance build-up, but it never the
> less can and will alleviate opioid WDs.
>
> As for Robitussin, it simply contains codeine, which is an opioid, a basic
> one.
> There's also a version that does not contain codeine, only
> pseudoephedrine, (a decongestant, but also the precursor to crystal meth)
>
> So all is pretty simple, in my opinion.
>
> Sergey
>
>
> On Mon, Oct 14, 2013 at 7:51 PM, Eddie Caceres <ebrvwarr at aol.com> wrote:
>
>> Check out this video on YouTube: has anyone heard about this?
>>
>> http://youtu.be/2pj9g1FEknM
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
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