[Ibogaine] Ibogaine Digest, Vol 11, Issue 67

Jeremy Spence jlspence at mac.com
Thu Jul 24 21:36:28 EDT 2008


I sure they find a way, If worse comes to worse their call up Coke  
king Bushy, He will make it happen for them!!!
On Jul 24, 2008, at 8:32 PM, ibogaine-request at mindvox.com wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Re: news,  cops cant drug test for free anymore in az
>      (Adam Nodelman)
>   2. Re: news,  cops cant drug test for free anymore in az (Dana Beal)
>   3. Re: news,  cops cant drug test for free anymore in az (DC in AZ)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2008 17:19:32 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Adam Nodelman <jonathanswiftboat at yahoo.com>
> Subject: Re: [Ibogaine] news,  cops cant drug test for free anymore in
> 	az
> To: The Ibogaine List <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
> Message-ID: <436464.5074.qm at web37401.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> I'm sure they will find a way...less rape kits or less surveillance  
> of level 1 sex offenders is my guess.
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: DC in AZ <dcollier9 at cox.net>
> To: The Ibogaine List <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
> Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2008 12:20:52 PM
> Subject: [Ibogaine] news,  cops cant drug test for free anymore in az
>
> By Howard Fischer
> Capitol Media Services
>
> Published on Thursday, July 24, 2008
>
> PHOENIX - A last-minute deal to balance the state budget could force  
> local
> police to choose between laying off workers or not pursuing certain  
> crimes.
>
> The budget which Gov. Janet Napolitano helped craft cuts the state
> allocation for the Department of Public Safety crime lab by more  
> than half.
> It also directs the agency to make up that difference by billing  
> police,
> fire and sheriff's departments and medical examiner's offices a  
> total of
> $7.8 million for lab work that, until now, was done for free.
>
> And because the budget deal was not made public until late June, it  
> also
> came after cities and counties already had adopted their own budget -
> budgets which never counted on a new bill from DPS.
>
> Cochise County Sheriff Larry Dever said Wednesday that goes back on  
> what
> essentially was a promise made when tax dollars were used to set up  
> the
> crime lab in the first place - that the lab would provide services  
> to police
> agencies throughout the state.
>
> "I think it's a little outrageous," said Dever, whose agency would  
> have to
> pay $137,000 this year under a proposal crafted by DPS. More to the  
> point,
> he said it could hamper crime fighting efforts.
>
> "The dangerous part, of course, is that law enforcement agencies may  
> be in a
> position because of cost to have to kind of 'cherry pick' which  
> cases they're
> going to send up to the lab for analysis," Dever said. "A lot of  
> potentially
> useful information and lab analysis that we get that could lead to  
> other
> convictions down the road is going to be lost."
>
> Flagstaff Police Chief Brent Cooper, whose agency would need to come  
> up with
> more than $233,000, said he was particularly upset that no one  
> bothered to
> tell police chiefs and sheriffs this was even being considered. Now,  
> Cooper
> said, his department is going to have to figure out how to come up  
> with the
> cash without scrapping investigations.
>
> "I do pledge to the victims of our community that we will do  
> everything we
> can within our power to make sure that their cases are processed  
> properly,"
> he said.
>
> The idea did not come from DPS.
>
> "We're not in favor of doing this," said Deputy DPS Director Pennie
> Gillette-Stroud. But she said she recognizes that the state's  
> economy has
> resulted in not enough tax revenues to support all government  
> services.
>
> "There had to be a way to be able to make attempts to balance the  
> budget for
> the state," she said.
>
> Napolitano echoed that theme, citing the $2 billion gap between  
> anticipated
> revenues and expenses.
>
> "The pain is going to have to be spread in many ways," she said.
>
> "In an ideal situation, sure, you would like to provide those  
> services free
> of charge," the governor continued. "But we weren't dealing with an  
> ideal
> situation."
>
> Tom Kelly, a spokesman for the Apache Junction police department,  
> called the
> more than $121,000 hit to his department "devastating."
>
> "I don't know where the money will come from," he said. "There could  
> be
> layoffs or less city services in public works, the library or public
> safety."
>
> And then there's the option of simply ordering less lab work.
>
> "We can't tell a family that their family member is less important  
> than
> anyone else," Kelly said. "It may be a question of 'Do we send for  
> blood?'
> (or) 'Do we go for latent (prints)?' "
>
> Even Tucson Police Department, which has its own crime lab, will be  
> hit to
> the tune of about $91,000 because it sends blood and urine samples  
> to DPS
> for drug analysis. Sgt. Fabian Pacheco said his agency will have to  
> find the
> money somewhere to ensure that all cases are prosecuted.
>
> "I don't think victims should have to pay the price" of the budget  
> crunch,
> he said.
>
> Clint Norred, an officer with the Yuma Police Department said the  
> question
> of what to do next will depend on exactly how DPS structures its  
> billing.
>
> One approach is based on the amount of lab work each agency sent to  
> DPS last
> year. In Yuma's case that would be more than $112,000.
>
> But another option would be the a la carte approach, with agencies  
> paying
> for each procedure requested.
>
> For example, DPS would charge $87 to analyze a blood sample for  
> alcohol and
> provide the necessary court testimony.
>
> Lab work for "date rape" drugs would cost $330 each, with biological
> screening running between $125 and $500 per case.
>
> Norred said if that becomes the billing method his department will be
> shopping around to see if a private lab can do the work cheaper.
>
> And Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio said his agency, facing a  
> potential
> $354,000 bill, may follow the lead of Mesa and Scottsdale police who  
> have
> set up their own crime labs.
>
> Arpaio also pointed out that DPS will be operating a new statewide  
> photo
> radar system which Gov. Janet Napolitano has predicted should bring  
> in $90
> million during its first partial year of operation. Those anticipated
> revenues were not considered in balancing the budget.
>
> "Why doesn't DPS take some of the money they're going to make with  
> photo
> radar enforcement and put it to this?" he asked. "Why now mess with  
> law
> enforcement and make them pay for crime analysis?"
>
> The change affects not just police but any agency that needs lab  
> work. That
> includes the Pima County Attorney's Office which sometimes requests  
> DNA or
> fingerprint analysis.
>
> "We understand that the state is having a tight year," said David  
> Berkman,
> the agency's chief criminal deputy. "But we're having a tight year  
> with our
> budget."
>
> Berkman noted, though, that the anticipated bill for his agency is  
> less than
> $8,000, something he said it will be able to absorb.
>
> Below is are preliminary figures based on a draft obtained from the  
> Arizona
> Department of Public Safety on what it is considering charging each  
> agency
> for lab services to save $7.8 million in its budget.
>
> Municipal
>
> . Benson Police Department: $41,908.73
>
> . Bisbee Police Department: $7,495.28
>
> . Douglas Police Department: $72,589.99
>
> . Huachuca City Police Department: $2,024.35
>
> . Patagonia Marshal's Office: 1,452.93$
>
> . Sierra Vista Police Department: $196,927.91
>
> . Tombstone Marshal's Office: $2,273.23
>
> . Statewide city subtotal: $5,689,385.25
>
> Counties
>
> . Cochise County Attorney's Office: $710.20
>
> . Cochise County Sheriff's Office: $137,066.20
>
> . Santa Cruz County Attorney: $236.73
>
> . Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Office: $27,562.06
>
> . Santa Cruz METRO Task Force: $18,503.60
>
> . County subtotal: $2,110,914.75
>
> Overall total: $7,800,300
>
> Source: Department of Public Safety
>
> * Note that these preliminary figures are based on the number and  
> type of
> cases each agency referred to the crime lab last year.
>
> John Leptich of Tribune Newspapers contributed to this report.
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Don zo
> "Love converts hearts, and gives peace."
> __________________________________________________
>
>
>
>  -=[) ::::::: MindVox | Ibogaine | List Commands ::::::: (]=-
> (][%]  :: http://mindvox.com/mailman/listinfo/ibogaine ::  [%][)
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> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2008 20:43:33 -0400
> From: Dana Beal <dana at phantom.com>
> Subject: Re: [Ibogaine] news,  cops cant drug test for free anymore in
> 	az
> To: The Ibogaine List <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
> Message-ID: <8B5DDA75-EB27-4F28-8CD3-9767808D7790 at phantom.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> No! They're going to cut loose armed robbers!
>
> Wait a minute.
>
> They ARE the armed robbers.
>
> Dana/cnw
>
> On Jul 24, 2008, at 8:19 PM, Adam Nodelman wrote:
>
>> I'm sure they will find a way...less rape kits or less surveillance
>> of level 1 sex offenders is my guess.
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----
>> From: DC in AZ <dcollier9 at cox.net>
>> To: The Ibogaine List <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
>> Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2008 12:20:52 PM
>> Subject: [Ibogaine] news, cops cant drug test for free anymore in az
>>
>> By Howard Fischer
>> Capitol Media Services
>>
>> Published on Thursday, July 24, 2008
>>
>> PHOENIX - A last-minute deal to balance the state budget could
>> force local
>> police to choose between laying off workers or not pursuing certain
>> crimes.
>>
>> The budget which Gov. Janet Napolitano helped craft cuts the state
>> allocation for the Department of Public Safety crime lab by more
>> than half.
>> It also directs the agency to make up that difference by billing
>> police,
>> fire and sheriff's departments and medical examiner's offices a
>> total of
>> $7.8 million for lab work that, until now, was done for free.
>>
>> And because the budget deal was not made public until late June, it
>> also
>> came after cities and counties already had adopted their own budget -
>> budgets which never counted on a new bill from DPS.
>>
>> Cochise County Sheriff Larry Dever said Wednesday that goes back on
>> what
>> essentially was a promise made when tax dollars were used to set up
>> the
>> crime lab in the first place - that the lab would provide services
>> to police
>> agencies throughout the state.
>>
>> "I think it's a little outrageous," said Dever, whose agency would
>> have to
>> pay $137,000 this year under a proposal crafted by DPS. More to the
>> point,
>> he said it could hamper crime fighting efforts.
>>
>> "The dangerous part, of course, is that law enforcement agencies
>> may be in a
>> position because of cost to have to kind of 'cherry pick' which
>> cases they're
>> going to send up to the lab for analysis," Dever said. "A lot of
>> potentially
>> useful information and lab analysis that we get that could lead to
>> other
>> convictions down the road is going to be lost."
>>
>> Flagstaff Police Chief Brent Cooper, whose agency would need to
>> come up with
>> more than $233,000, said he was particularly upset that no one
>> bothered to
>> tell police chiefs and sheriffs this was even being considered.
>> Now, Cooper
>> said, his department is going to have to figure out how to come up
>> with the
>> cash without scrapping investigations.
>>
>> "I do pledge to the victims of our community that we will do
>> everything we
>> can within our power to make sure that their cases are processed
>> properly,"
>> he said.
>>
>> The idea did not come from DPS.
>>
>> "We're not in favor of doing this," said Deputy DPS Director Pennie
>> Gillette-Stroud. But she said she recognizes that the state's
>> economy has
>> resulted in not enough tax revenues to support all government
>> services.
>>
>> "There had to be a way to be able to make attempts to balance the
>> budget for
>> the state," she said.
>>
>> Napolitano echoed that theme, citing the $2 billion gap between
>> anticipated
>> revenues and expenses.
>>
>> "The pain is going to have to be spread in many ways," she said.
>>
>> "In an ideal situation, sure, you would like to provide those
>> services free
>> of charge," the governor continued. "But we weren't dealing with an
>> ideal
>> situation."
>>
>> Tom Kelly, a spokesman for the Apache Junction police department,
>> called the
>> more than $121,000 hit to his department "devastating."
>>
>> "I don't know where the money will come from," he said. "There
>> could be
>> layoffs or less city services in public works, the library or public
>> safety."
>>
>> And then there's the option of simply ordering less lab work.
>>
>> "We can't tell a family that their family member is less important
>> than
>> anyone else," Kelly said. "It may be a question of 'Do we send for
>> blood?'
>> (or) 'Do we go for latent (prints)?' "
>>
>> Even Tucson Police Department, which has its own crime lab, will be
>> hit to
>> the tune of about $91,000 because it sends blood and urine samples
>> to DPS
>> for drug analysis. Sgt. Fabian Pacheco said his agency will have to
>> find the
>> money somewhere to ensure that all cases are prosecuted.
>>
>> "I don't think victims should have to pay the price" of the budget
>> crunch,
>> he said.
>>
>> Clint Norred, an officer with the Yuma Police Department said the
>> question
>> of what to do next will depend on exactly how DPS structures its
>> billing.
>>
>> One approach is based on the amount of lab work each agency sent to
>> DPS last
>> year. In Yuma's case that would be more than $112,000.
>>
>> But another option would be the a la carte approach, with agencies
>> paying
>> for each procedure requested.
>>
>> For example, DPS would charge $87 to analyze a blood sample for
>> alcohol and
>> provide the necessary court testimony.
>>
>> Lab work for "date rape" drugs would cost $330 each, with biological
>> screening running between $125 and $500 per case.
>>
>> Norred said if that becomes the billing method his department will be
>> shopping around to see if a private lab can do the work cheaper.
>>
>> And Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio said his agency, facing a
>> potential
>> $354,000 bill, may follow the lead of Mesa and Scottsdale police
>> who have
>> set up their own crime labs.
>>
>> Arpaio also pointed out that DPS will be operating a new statewide
>> photo
>> radar system which Gov. Janet Napolitano has predicted should bring
>> in $90
>> million during its first partial year of operation. Those anticipated
>> revenues were not considered in balancing the budget.
>>
>> "Why doesn't DPS take some of the money they're going to make with
>> photo
>> radar enforcement and put it to this?" he asked. "Why now mess with
>> law
>> enforcement and make them pay for crime analysis?"
>>
>> The change affects not just police but any agency that needs lab
>> work. That
>> includes the Pima County Attorney's Office which sometimes requests
>> DNA or
>> fingerprint analysis.
>>
>> "We understand that the state is having a tight year," said David
>> Berkman,
>> the agency's chief criminal deputy. "But we're having a tight year
>> with our
>> budget."
>>
>> Berkman noted, though, that the anticipated bill for his agency is
>> less than
>> $8,000, something he said it will be able to absorb.
>>
>> Below is are preliminary figures based on a draft obtained from the
>> Arizona
>> Department of Public Safety on what it is considering charging each
>> agency
>> for lab services to save $7.8 million in its budget.
>>
>> Municipal
>>
>> . Benson Police Department: $41,908.73
>>
>> . Bisbee Police Department: $7,495.28
>>
>> . Douglas Police Department: $72,589.99
>>
>> . Huachuca City Police Department: $2,024.35
>>
>> . Patagonia Marshal's Office: 1,452.93$
>>
>> . Sierra Vista Police Department: $196,927.91
>>
>> . Tombstone Marshal's Office: $2,273.23
>>
>> . Statewide city subtotal: $5,689,385.25
>>
>> Counties
>>
>> . Cochise County Attorney's Office: $710.20
>>
>> . Cochise County Sheriff's Office: $137,066.20
>>
>> . Santa Cruz County Attorney: $236.73
>>
>> . Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Office: $27,562.06
>>
>> . Santa Cruz METRO Task Force: $18,503.60
>>
>> . County subtotal: $2,110,914.75
>>
>> Overall total: $7,800,300
>>
>> Source: Department of Public Safety
>>
>> * Note that these preliminary figures are based on the number and
>> type of
>> cases each agency referred to the crime lab last year.
>>
>> John Leptich of Tribune Newspapers contributed to this report.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>> -----
>> Don zo
>> "Love converts hearts, and gives peace."
>> __________________________________________________
>>
>>
>>
>>  -=[) ::::::: MindVox | Ibogaine | List Commands ::::::: (]=-
>> (][%]  :: http://mindvox.com/mailman/listinfo/ibogaine ::  [%][)
>>  -=[) :::: Change Account Settings :: [Un]Subscribe :::: (]=-
>>
>>
>>  -=[) ::::::: MindVox | Ibogaine | List Commands ::::::: (]=-
>> (][%]  :: http://mindvox.com/mailman/listinfo/ibogaine ::  [%][)
>>  -=[) :::: Change Account Settings :: [Un]Subscribe :::: (]=-
>
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> URL: http://www.mindvox.com/pipermail/ibogaine/attachments/20080724/a3e84b05/attachment-0001.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2008 18:31:57 -0700
> From: "DC in AZ" <dcollier9 at cox.net>
> Subject: Re: [Ibogaine] news,  cops cant drug test for free anymore in
> 	az
> To: "The Ibogaine List" <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
> Message-ID:
> 	<463085FF0D654D3888776ABA5189E843 at agi.alexandergroupinc.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> police mafia rules
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Donzo in tears
> "Love converts hearts, and gives peace."
> __________________________________________________
>
>  ----- Original Message -----
>  From: Dana Beal
>  To: The Ibogaine List
>  Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2008 5:43 PM
>  Subject: Re: [Ibogaine] news, cops cant drug test for free anymore  
> in az
>
>
>  No! They're going to cut loose armed robbers!
>
>
>  Wait a minute.
>
>
>  They ARE the armed robbers.
>
>
>  Dana/cnw
>
>
>  On Jul 24, 2008, at 8:19 PM, Adam Nodelman wrote:
>
>
>    I'm sure they will find a way...less rape kits or less  
> surveillance of level 1 sex offenders is my guess.
>
>
>
>    ----- Original Message ----
>    From: DC in AZ <dcollier9 at cox.net>
>    To: The Ibogaine List <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
>    Sent: Thursday, July 24, 2008 12:20:52 PM
>    Subject: [Ibogaine] news, cops cant drug test for free anymore in  
> az
>
>    By Howard Fischer
>    Capitol Media Services
>
>    Published on Thursday, July 24, 2008
>
>    PHOENIX - A last-minute deal to balance the state budget could  
> force local
>    police to choose between laying off workers or not pursuing  
> certain crimes.
>
>    The budget which Gov. Janet Napolitano helped craft cuts the state
>    allocation for the Department of Public Safety crime lab by more  
> than half.
>    It also directs the agency to make up that difference by billing  
> police,
>    fire and sheriff's departments and medical examiner's offices a  
> total of
>    $7.8 million for lab work that, until now, was done for free.
>
>    And because the budget deal was not made public until late June,  
> it also
>    came after cities and counties already had adopted their own  
> budget -
>    budgets which never counted on a new bill from DPS.
>
>    Cochise County Sheriff Larry Dever said Wednesday that goes back  
> on what
>    essentially was a promise made when tax dollars were used to set  
> up the
>    crime lab in the first place - that the lab would provide  
> services to police
>    agencies throughout the state.
>
>    "I think it's a little outrageous," said Dever, whose agency  
> would have to
>    pay $137,000 this year under a proposal crafted by DPS. More to  
> the point,
>    he said it could hamper crime fighting efforts.
>
>    "The dangerous part, of course, is that law enforcement agencies  
> may be in a
>    position because of cost to have to kind of 'cherry pick' which  
> cases they're
>    going to send up to the lab for analysis," Dever said. "A lot of  
> potentially
>    useful information and lab analysis that we get that could lead  
> to other
>    convictions down the road is going to be lost."
>
>    Flagstaff Police Chief Brent Cooper, whose agency would need to  
> come up with
>    more than $233,000, said he was particularly upset that no one  
> bothered to
>    tell police chiefs and sheriffs this was even being considered.  
> Now, Cooper
>    said, his department is going to have to figure out how to come  
> up with the
>    cash without scrapping investigations.
>
>    "I do pledge to the victims of our community that we will do  
> everything we
>    can within our power to make sure that their cases are processed  
> properly,"
>    he said.
>
>    The idea did not come from DPS.
>
>    "We're not in favor of doing this," said Deputy DPS Director Pennie
>    Gillette-Stroud. But she said she recognizes that the state's  
> economy has
>    resulted in not enough tax revenues to support all government  
> services.
>
>    "There had to be a way to be able to make attempts to balance the  
> budget for
>    the state," she said.
>
>    Napolitano echoed that theme, citing the $2 billion gap between  
> anticipated
>    revenues and expenses.
>
>    "The pain is going to have to be spread in many ways," she said.
>
>    "In an ideal situation, sure, you would like to provide those  
> services free
>    of charge," the governor continued. "But we weren't dealing with  
> an ideal
>    situation."
>
>    Tom Kelly, a spokesman for the Apache Junction police department,  
> called the
>    more than $121,000 hit to his department "devastating."
>
>    "I don't know where the money will come from," he said. "There  
> could be
>    layoffs or less city services in public works, the library or  
> public
>    safety."
>
>    And then there's the option of simply ordering less lab work.
>
>    "We can't tell a family that their family member is less  
> important than
>    anyone else," Kelly said. "It may be a question of 'Do we send  
> for blood?'
>    (or) 'Do we go for latent (prints)?' "
>
>    Even Tucson Police Department, which has its own crime lab, will  
> be hit to
>    the tune of about $91,000 because it sends blood and urine  
> samples to DPS
>    for drug analysis. Sgt. Fabian Pacheco said his agency will have  
> to find the
>    money somewhere to ensure that all cases are prosecuted.
>
>    "I don't think victims should have to pay the price" of the  
> budget crunch,
>    he said.
>
>    Clint Norred, an officer with the Yuma Police Department said the  
> question
>    of what to do next will depend on exactly how DPS structures its  
> billing.
>
>    One approach is based on the amount of lab work each agency sent  
> to DPS last
>    year. In Yuma's case that would be more than $112,000.
>
>    But another option would be the a la carte approach, with  
> agencies paying
>    for each procedure requested.
>
>    For example, DPS would charge $87 to analyze a blood sample for  
> alcohol and
>    provide the necessary court testimony.
>
>    Lab work for "date rape" drugs would cost $330 each, with  
> biological
>    screening running between $125 and $500 per case.
>
>    Norred said if that becomes the billing method his department  
> will be
>    shopping around to see if a private lab can do the work cheaper.
>
>    And Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio said his agency, facing a  
> potential
>    $354,000 bill, may follow the lead of Mesa and Scottsdale police  
> who have
>    set up their own crime labs.
>
>    Arpaio also pointed out that DPS will be operating a new  
> statewide photo
>    radar system which Gov. Janet Napolitano has predicted should  
> bring in $90
>    million during its first partial year of operation. Those  
> anticipated
>    revenues were not considered in balancing the budget.
>
>    "Why doesn't DPS take some of the money they're going to make  
> with photo
>    radar enforcement and put it to this?" he asked. "Why now mess  
> with law
>    enforcement and make them pay for crime analysis?"
>
>    The change affects not just police but any agency that needs lab  
> work. That
>    includes the Pima County Attorney's Office which sometimes  
> requests DNA or
>    fingerprint analysis.
>
>    "We understand that the state is having a tight year," said David  
> Berkman,
>    the agency's chief criminal deputy. "But we're having a tight  
> year with our
>    budget."
>
>    Berkman noted, though, that the anticipated bill for his agency  
> is less than
>    $8,000, something he said it will be able to absorb.
>
>    Below is are preliminary figures based on a draft obtained from  
> the Arizona
>    Department of Public Safety on what it is considering charging  
> each agency
>    for lab services to save $7.8 million in its budget.
>
>    Municipal
>
>    . Benson Police Department: $41,908.73
>
>    . Bisbee Police Department: $7,495.28
>
>    . Douglas Police Department: $72,589.99
>
>    . Huachuca City Police Department: $2,024.35
>
>    . Patagonia Marshal's Office: 1,452.93$
>
>    . Sierra Vista Police Department: $196,927.91
>
>    . Tombstone Marshal's Office: $2,273.23
>
>    . Statewide city subtotal: $5,689,385.25
>
>    Counties
>
>    . Cochise County Attorney's Office: $710.20
>
>    . Cochise County Sheriff's Office: $137,066.20
>
>    . Santa Cruz County Attorney: $236.73
>
>    . Santa Cruz County Sheriff's Office: $27,562.06
>
>    . Santa Cruz METRO Task Force: $18,503.60
>
>    . County subtotal: $2,110,914.75
>
>    Overall total: $7,800,300
>
>    Source: Department of Public Safety
>
>    * Note that these preliminary figures are based on the number and  
> type of
>    cases each agency referred to the crime lab last year.
>
>    John Leptich of Tribune Newspapers contributed to this report.
>
>
>
>
>     
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
>    Don zo
>    "Love converts hearts, and gives peace."
>    __________________________________________________
>
>
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