[ibogaine] Re: [drugwar] LINKED FROM DRUDGE!

Preston Peet ptpeet at nyc.rr.com
Sat Feb 21 12:23:26 EST 2004


Oh, oops. Sorry 'bout that, I musta been not paying close attention,
stopping when I read that bit without going on.
My bad.
Peace all,
Preston


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ethan Straffin" <drumz at best.com>
To: <drugwar at mindvox.com>
Cc: <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
Sent: Friday, February 20, 2004 11:05 PM
Subject: [ibogaine] Re: [drugwar] LINKED FROM DRUDGE!


>
> On Friday, February 20, 2004, at 07:45  PM, Preston Peet wrote:
>
> > Didn't it take a couple tries with ibogaine for Patrick to finally get
> > unsprung for as long as he has now and not actually that first time?
> > Patrick?
> >     If so, this information in the article is not quite right, and
> > while I
> > personally want ibogaine available legally to any and all adults who
> > request
> > it, I wish it had been made clear here it doesn't always work like a
> > magic
> > bullet, even as miraculous as it can work for quite a few of those who
> > do
> > try it.
>
> Wow, Preston...tough crowd.  This part really doesn't do it for you?  ;)
>
> --
> Ibogaine will not work for everyone. And even for those for whom it does
> work, it is not a "magic bullet." "You need treatment, you need social
> workers, you need case management, you need medication, psychiatry, you
> need
> the whole boat of professionalism around this," says Dr. Mash.
> --
>
> Ethan
>
> > Vigilius Haufniensis posted at DrugWar.com:
> >
> > http://www.kron4.com/Global/story.asp?S=1652207&nav=5D7iKvRG
> >
> >> "Our first round in St. Kitts, we treated six individuals, and I will
> > go to my grave with the memory of that first round," says Dr. Mash.
> > It quickly became apparent that one dose of ibogaine blocked the
> > withdrawal
> > symptoms of even hard-core addicts and was amazingly effective for
> > heroin,
> > crack cocaine and even alcohol.
> > There are two reasons why: The first, science can measure. The second
> > remains a mystery.
> > Dr. Mash admits, "I was really scared. I questioned my own sanity on
> > numerous occasions."
> > "I don't like the word 'hallucinogen,' but indeed, ibogaine alters
> > mental
> > state. And what it seems to do is it puts people into a four to six
> > hour
> > state of almost an active dream, it's like a lucid dream." she
> > describes.
> > But as Dr. Mash was about to discover, during that dream state,
> > something
> > extraordinary happens. "We knew ibogaine was effective for blocking
> > opiate
> > withdrawal, we saw it diminish the desire to use alcohol. And we saw
> > the
> > cravings for cocaine blocked. I was hooked," she says.
> > Patrick admits, "It's literally like a miracle. Nothing has ever
> > worked and
> > this just did." He was one of the 280 people in Dr. Mash's trial of
> > ibogaine.
> > "Patrick was one of the worst opiate addicts, worst heroin addicts
> > that I
> > have ever enountered in my life," says Dr. Mash. His arms still bear
> > the
> > scars of years of heroin addiction, and he knows only too well what
> > happened
> > when the flow of drugs into those arms was interrupted. "When you're
> > going
> > through withdrawal, you're sweating, you're shaking, you're freezing,
> > you're
> > hot, it feels like your spine is being smashed in a vise, it's pain,"
> > describes Patrick.
> > Within 45 minutes of taking ibogaine, he actually felt his addiction
> > leaving
> > him. "That moment is the first time in about 10 years that I had
> > actually
> > been clean. Not just detoxed, but clean. That was it. That was the
> > first
> > time. That was like a miracle," says Patrick
> > That was four years ago. Patrick Kroupa has not touched drugs since.
> > "I'm
> > saying this having been on heroin for my entire adult life. I mean, 14
> > to 30
> > is a long time," he says.<
> >
> > Peace,
> > Preston
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: Vigilius Haufniensis
> > To: drugwar at mindvox.com
> > Sent: Friday, February 20, 2004 7:56 PM
> > Subject: [drugwar] LINKED FROM DRUDGE!
> >
> >
> > http://www.kron4.com/Global/story.asp?S=1652207&nav=5D7iKvRG
> >
> > Hallucinogen May Cure Drug Addiction
> >
> > BAY AREA (KRON) -- Drug addiction has been the plague of modern
> > America. But
> > that could now change forever. What started as a rumor may now
> > actually be
> > an incredible breakthrough in the battle against addictions of all
> > kinds.
> > Ibogaine has a number of strikes against it:
> > It doesn't come from a modern laboratory, but from an ancient plant.
> > It was discovered not by a scientist, but by a heroin addict.
> > It is mildly hallucinogenic and completely illegal in the United
> > States.
> > However, when it comes to curing addiction, a reputable scientist
> > believes
> > ibogaine is nothing short of a miracle. "I didn't believe it when I
> > first
> > heard about ibogaine. I thought it was something that needed to be
> > debunked," admits Dr. Deborah Mash, professor of Neurology and
> > Molecular and
> > Cellular Pharmacology at University of Miami.
> > Dr. Mash is one of the few scientists in the world to study ibogaine,
> > a mild
> > hallucinogen that comes from the root of a shrub found in West Africa
> > and
> > was rumored to have the amazing ability to help drug addicts kick their
> > addiction.
> > "This didn't come from the Salk Institute, this didn't come from the
> > Scripps
> > Institute. This came from a junkie who took a dose to get high
> > himself. So
> > the original observation came from the underground," says Dr. Mash.
> > Observations from this particular underground are not likely to gain
> > the
> > respect of mainstream society, and ibogaine was no exception.
> > That first report came in 1962. But decades would pass with little
> > scientific investigation. There were decades during which the cost of
> > addiction in terms of medical care, lost productivity, crime and
> > incarceration rose to $160 billion a year.
> > The human toll was impossible to calculate.
> > Patrick Kroupa was a heroin addict for 16 of his 35 years. "It was a
> > very
> > high level of desperation. I had been pretty successful in my life, I
> > had
> > accomplished a lot of things I wanted to do, and then repeatedly I just
> > watched everything burst into flames and disintegrate because I could
> > not
> > stay off heroin," confesses Patrick. "It gets very tiring living like a
> > slave because you keep chasing this and it's like you're not getting
> > high,
> > it's just 'I must do this every single day just to get normal so I can
> > function.'"
> > Like most addicts, Patrick tried to quit. But treatment for addiction
> > is
> > notoriously ineffective. Only one in ten addicts manages to return to a
> > drug-free life. Most stay dependent on illegal drugs or their legal
> > substitutes, like methadone.
> > "And I was a spectacular failure at every possible treatment modality,
> > every
> > paradigm, every detox, every therapy, nothing ever worked," admits
> > Patrick.
> > Even as Patrick Kroupa despaired of ever kicking heroin, Dr. Mash was
> > petitioning the Federal Food and Drug Administration to allow a
> > scientific
> > test of ibogaine, which by this time had been classified as a
> > "schedule one"
> > drug on a par with heroin. In 1993, the FDA approval came through.
> > "We were established, we had a team of research scientists, doctors,
> > clinicians, psychiatrists, toxicologists and we wanted to go forward
> > with
> > this," describes Dr. Mash.
> > But even with FDA approval, Dr. Mash could not get funding to look
> > into what
> > was, after all, a counter-culture drug. In order to complete her
> > project,
> > she had to leave South Florida and go offshore, to the island of St.
> > Kitts.
> > In 1998, clinical trials finally got underway. Patients were given
> > carefully
> > prepared oral doses of ibogaine. What happened next astounded the
> > sceptical
> > scientist.
> > "Our first round in St. Kitts, we treated six individuals, and I will
> > go to
> > my grave with the memory of that first round," says Dr. Mash.
> > It quickly became apparent that one dose of ibogaine blocked the
> > withdrawal
> > symptoms of even hard-core addicts and was amazingly effective for
> > heroin,
> > crack cocaine and even alcohol.
> > There are two reasons why: The first, science can measure. The second
> > remains a mystery.
> > Dr. Mash admits, "I was really scared. I questioned my own sanity on
> > numerous occasions."
> > "I don't like the word 'hallucinogen,' but indeed, ibogaine alters
> > mental
> > state. And what it seems to do is it puts people into a four to six
> > hour
> > state of almost an active dream, it's like a lucid dream." she
> > describes.
> > But as Dr. Mash was about to discover, during that dream state,
> > something
> > extraordinary happens. "We knew ibogaine was effective for blocking
> > opiate
> > withdrawal, we saw it diminish the desire to use alcohol. And we saw
> > the
> > cravings for cocaine blocked. I was hooked," she says.
> > Patrick admits, "It's literally like a miracle. Nothing has ever
> > worked and
> > this just did." He was one of the 280 people in Dr. Mash's trial of
> > ibogaine.
> > "Patrick was one of the worst opiate addicts, worst heroin addicts
> > that I
> > have ever enountered in my life," says Dr. Mash. His arms still bear
> > the
> > scars of years of heroin addiction, and he knows only too well what
> > happened
> > when the flow of drugs into those arms was interrupted. "When you're
> > going
> > through withdrawal, you're sweating, you're shaking, you're freezing,
> > you're
> > hot, it feels like your spine is being smashed in a vise, it's pain,"
> > describes Patrick.
> > Within 45 minutes of taking ibogaine, he actually felt his addiction
> > leaving
> > him. "That moment is the first time in about 10 years that I had
> > actually
> > been clean. Not just detoxed, but clean. That was it. That was the
> > first
> > time. That was like a miracle," says Patrick
> > That was four years ago. Patrick Kroupa has not touched drugs since.
> > "I'm
> > saying this having been on heroin for my entire adult life. I mean, 14
> > to 30
> > is a long time," he says.
> > On one level, Dr. Mash understands some of what happens. Ibogaine in
> > the
> > body is metabolized into another compound called 'noribogaine.'
> > Noribogaine
> > appears to reset chemical switches in the brain of an addict.
> > "The noribogaine resets that, so it resets the opiates, blocks the
> > opiate
> > withdrawal, diminishes craving and the desire to use, and it elevates
> > mood,"
> > say Dr. Mash.
> > But of the "visions" that people see, Dr. Mash understands very little
> > --
> > only that they are somehow significant to the outcome. "It's as if the
> > plant
> > is teaching you something fundamental about who you are as a person
> > and why
> > you've got yourself locked into this intractible pattern of behavior,"
> > she
> > says.
> > Ibogaine will not work for everyone. And even for those for whom it
> > does
> > work, it is not a "magic bullet." "You need treatment, you need social
> > workers, you need case management, you need medication, psychiatry,
> > you need
> > the whole boat of professionalism around this," says Dr. Mash.
> > But for Patrick Kroupa and many of the other addicts in the trials,
> > ibogaine
> > was a miracle. "It's like if you suffer from terminal cancer and
> > somebody
> > goes by and says, 'Oh, yeah, we cured that. We passed this thing over
> > you
> > and it's gone,'" he says.
> > Even the reserved scientist believes this ancient drug from Africa
> > holds
> > astounding promise for the modern world. "I think we're going to see
> > fantastic numbers. I think these numbers are going to be stunning,"
> > says Dr.
> > Mash.
> > Dr. Mash will present her findings to the Food and Drug Administration
> > next
> > month. She hopes the FDA will eventually authorize further testing,
> > based on
> > her results. In the meantime, ibogaine remains illegal in the United
> > States.
> > Ibogaine is advertised on the internet, but there is no guarantee of
> > the
> > quality unless it's given under medical supervision. And for now, that
> > can
> > only be done overseas.
> > For ibogaine detox information, contact Healing Transitions at
> > 1-888-426-4286 or www.Ibogaine.net
> >
> >
> >
> > <]=-------------------------------------------------------------------- 
> > ---=[>
> >   [           Moderated by: Preston Peet | http://www.drugwar.com
> >      ]
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