Fw: [drugwar] treating addiction to drugs with drugs

Preston Peet ptpeet at nyc.rr.com
Mon Aug 30 13:13:53 EDT 2004


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Libby" <baystatebar at yahoo.com>
To: "drugwar" <drugwar at mindvox.com>
Sent: Monday, August 30, 2004 8:14 AM
Subject: [drugwar] treating addiction to drugs with drugs


> Here's an article that rather fits into the recent
> discussion on rehab. How unsurprising that ibogaine, a
> natural substance is not mentioned but they do mention
> expanding the use of these chemicals to eventually
> "cure" cannabis addiction.
>
> sigh,
>
> Libby
>
>
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/T/TREATING_ADDICTION?SITE=CALOS&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
>
> NEW YORK (AP) -- Can Prozac help you kick cocaine? Can
> Ritalin? How about a blood pressure pill or medicine
> for muscle spasms? If you're an alcoholic, could you
> get help staying sober by taking an anti-nausea drug
> used by cancer patients?
>
> Scientists are exploring those questions right now. In
> fact, in the field of addiction medicine, one of the
> hottest sources of new drugs is ... old drugs. Despite
> years of research, there is no drug approved in the
> United States for treating cocaine dependence. To find
> such a treatment, the National Institute on Drug Abuse
> is sponsoring human studies of 21 medicines already on
> the market for something else. That's about two-thirds
> of all the potential cocaine drugs being tested in
> people, says Frank Vocci, director of NIDA's
> pharmacotherapy division.
>
> Over at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and
> Alcoholism, nearly all the potential alcoholism drugs
> tested in people under institute sponsorship over the
> past 10 years were previously approved for some other
> use, says Raye Litten, co-leader of the institute's
> medications development team.
>
> While the strategy is hardly new, "it's been going on
> maybe just a bit below the radar screen" for most of
> the public, Vocci said.
>
> It can certainly work. In 1997, for example, the
> government approved a stop-smoking pill called Zyban,
> which was in fact the older antidepressant Wellbutrin.
>
> To be sure, experts haven't given up on developing new
> drugs. Most NIAAA-funded drug studies for alcoholism
> that are in early stage testing - not yet tried on
> people - are brand-new drugs, Litten said.
>
> But the notion of examining current drugs for
> addiction-breaking potential holds several advantages.
> It's a lot cheaper to get federal approval for a new
> use of an old drug than to bring a completely new
> medicine to market. And experience with an existing
> drug gives an idea of its safety and dose range for
> possible anti-addiction effects, Vocci said.
> snip--
>
>
> =====
> Libby Spencer
> Northampton, MA 01060
> Publisher: Last One Speaks
> http://lastonespeaks.blogspot.com/
>
> Guest blogger: Detroit News
> http://info.detnews.com/weblog/
>
> email: baystatebar at yahoo.com
>
>
>
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