[ibogaine] Re: A Rant from Brain Ailment Not a Moral Lapse

Preston Peet ptpeet at nyc.rr.com
Thu Oct 2 18:11:17 EDT 2003


sorry, that should read "as recently as 2000," not "1996."
Still does it count?
Peace,
Preston


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Preston Peet" <ptpeet at nyc.rr.com>
To: <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 4:46 PM
Subject: Re: [ibogaine] Re: A Rant from Brain Ailment Not a Moral Lapse


> >(methadone clinics are not covered by insurance for example).<
>
> As recently as 1996, methadone clinics in NYC were covered by Medicare.
> Does that count as insurance?
> Peace,
> Preston
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: <deartheo at ziplip.com>
> To: <ibogaine at mindvox.com>
> Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 11:12 AM
> Subject: [ibogaine] Re: A Rant from Brain Ailment Not a Moral Lapse
>
>
> I think it blurs the reality of the situation when you start (as usually
is
> done) grouping all drugs as the same, especially if you start saying that
> using a substance (all of them?) is a disease.  For opioid addiction, yes
> absolutely it is a physical condition that should (but most often is not)
> covered by insurance (methadone clinics are not covered by insurance for
> example).  But even crack-cocaine isn't PHYSICALLY addicting, nor are
> hallucinogens or marijuana; but ironically enough alcohol if used daily
for
> some time IS physically addicting.  The fact is each individual drug
> deserves its own investigation because they are not the same.
> Unfortunately, to find the truth out from experience is to bite off more
> then one can chew usually.  So the majority of people (especially parents)
> go with the flow of misinformation given by gov't sponsored indoctrination
> programs usually taught by a police officer with a gun, and who in there
> right mind would argue with someone with a gun.
>
> I have found that I agree with what the Rational Recovery people say more
> then the 12 step addiction is a disease' way of thinking.  In other words,
i
> don't want my future self to continue to be plagued by my past, it is a
> matter to some extent of self identity (i am not a former junkie but a
> person) and keeping consistent on not throwing my hands up in the air
saying
> "fuck it" is essential.
>
> Could you say the same if chocolate were outlawed?  I do believe their is
a
> behavior of an 'addict', someone who can't own a espresso machine because
> they will drink 20 cups in an hour, but how often (if not opioids) does it
> really hurt physically if they stop whatever they choose that day (speed
and
> cocaine and even marijuana users find themselves in 12 step programs)?  To
> me that is compulsion not real addiction, and compulsion can be easily
> learned and with time and sincerity can be unlearned.
>   It appears to me that the way the systM is set up to use scare tactics
to
> "keep the majority of people from trying it even once" are a direct
> contributor to peoples willingness to experiment with new substances after
> trying marijuana for the first time after being told marijuana is as bad
as
> heroin and finding out through personal experience how safe it is
wrongfully
> assume that the rest of the substances are as safe as marijuana, which
with
> the possible exception of natural hallucinogens, they are not.  And the
> truth continues to be buried in so much misinformation and the truth from
> experience is stigmatized by misinformation supporters who are tying to
pass
> bills like the Victory Act, linking even drug USE with international
> terrorism with penalties that are way more then any violent rapist would
> receive.  And don't get me started on how politicians and media group
> non-violent crime and violent crime as simply "crime", again blurring the
> reality of the situation.
>
> So lets ask ourselves, why politicians aren't getting the legalization
> message to end economic opportunities for terrorist that would otherwise
not
> be there.  To be honest, their are very few US citizens who feel safe
saying
> it.  Even people who have never done a drug in their life see the logic in
> legalization, but to be in gov't and speaking this is political blasphemy
> and political suicide, or so they think.  And we have to consider the drug
> cartels prohibition creates have plenty of money to line the pocketbooks
of
> US politicians, US Gov't agencies, and US Banks for Fractal Reserve
Banking,
> where the number one borrower, the US Gov't can borrow up to 10 times what
> the bank has.  Not to mention the convenience of having an illegal trade
to
> help some of our poor "friend" nations or uprisings of enemy nations to
help
> fund their efforts.  We can't even have a national debate about
legalization
> because technically the RAVE ACT (passed as an attachment to a very
> legitimate National 'Amber Alert' Bill) gives authorities the legal
> authority to harass the organizer and shut the event down.  They have
> already enforced the RAVE ACT with a NORML chapter meeting.  I guess to
test
> the waters.  But we seem not to act unless the news media tells us to
react.
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Preston Peet [mailto:ptpeet at nyc.rr.com]
> > Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003, 7:06 AM
> > To: ibogaine at mindvox.com
> > Subject: [ibogaine] Fw: [drugwar] Addiction: A Brain Ailment, Not a
Moral
> > Lapse
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > From: "Libby" <baystatebar at yahoo.com>
> > To: "drugwar" <drugwar at mindvox.com>
> > Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2003 3:40 PM
> > Subject: [drugwar] Addiction: A Brain Ailment, Not a Moral Lapse
> >
> >
> > > Pretty good article on the cause of addiction.
> > >
> > > Libby
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/30/health/30BROD.html?ex=1065977001&ei=1&en=b2b
> > 4bfd824843895
> > >
> > > excerpts:
> > >
> > > In other words, addiction is a brain disease, not a
> > > moral failing or behavior problem. People do not
> > > deliberately set out to become addicts. Rather, for
> > > any number of reasons - like wanting to be part of the
> > > crowd or seeking relief from intense emotional or
> > > physical pain - people may start using a substance and
> > > soon find themselves unable to stop.
> > >
> > > Because prolonged exposure to abused drugs results in
> > > long-lasting changes in the brain, "addiction should
> > > be considered a chronic medical illness," the
> > > Barcelona scientists said. As with other chronic
> > > illnesses, including hypertension and diabetes,
> > > addiction and its treatment require "long-term
> > > strategies based on medication, psychological support
> > > and continued monitoring," they concluded. In
> > > addition, other experts have suggested, treatment of
> > > addiction should be fully insured with no limit on the
> > > number of visits covered.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > =====
> > > Libby Spencer
> > > Northampton, MA 01060
> > > PUBLISHER: LAST ONE SPEAKS
> > > http://lastonespeaks.blogspot.com/
> > >
> > > email: baystatebar at yahoo.com
> > >
> > > __________________________________
> > > Do you Yahoo!?
> > > The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search
> > > http://shopping.yahoo.com
> > >
> > >
> >
>
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> >
> >
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